Landchester


wwwwww.photography.landchester.co.uk

photography books
   
Home Bestsellers Historic Photojournalism War Landscape Portraits Family Wildlife Fashion Art Modern Subjects Sitemap  
 

William Eggleston snippet
William Eggleston (born July 27, 1939) is an American photographer. He is widely credited with securing recognition for colour photography as a legitimate artistic medium to display in art galleries. Eggleston's was the first one-person exhibition of colour photographs in the history of MOMA.
William Eggleston
William Eggleston (born July 27, 1939) is an American photographer. He is widely credited with securing recognition for colour photography as a legitimate artistic medium to display in art galleries.
Eggleston's early photographic efforts were inspired by the work of Swiss-born photographer Robert Frank and by French photographer Henri Cartier-Bresson's book, The Decisive Moment. At first photographing in black-and-white, Eggleston began experimenting with colour photography in 1965 and 1966, and colour transparency film became his dominant medium in the late sixties. Eggleston's development as a photographer seems to have taken place in relative isolation from other artists.
In 1970, Eggleston's friend William Christenberry introduced him to Walter Hopps, director of Washington, D.C.'s Corcoran Gallery. Hopps later said he was "stunned" by Eggleston's work: "I had never seen anything like it."